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      Nurturing people in the image of God since 1868.                                                                          POB 397/520 Dry Creek Rd./Smithville, TN

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What Are You Hungry For?

Dennis the Menace once said, "I said I'm hungry enough to eat a horse. I didn't say nothin' about carrots." At times our hunger is more for what tastes good to us than what is good for us. Fran Lebowitz noted, "Mealtime is the only time of the day when children resolutely refuse to eat." They often hold out for a "Happy Meal" or something sweeter to the taste than carrots or spinach, etc.! The burning question for millions in our culture is not, "Are you hungry?" but "What are you hungry for?" We have to get that worked out because practically every town and city in our nation offers a plethora of places to eat. Do you want Chinese, Italian, Japanese, Mexican, even Thai? Will it be fish tonight, or pork, or a steak, or chicken? Sushi anyone? Maybe spaghetti or pizza? In our "go out to eat" culture, the choices are seemingly endless, and so, to reiterate, we often hear the question, "What are you hungry for?" Investigative journalist Eric Schlosser revealed that we often opt to feed on "fast food." In his 2001 best selling book Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal, Schlosser reported that Americans spend more money on fast food than on higher education, computers, computer software or new cars. In fact, according to Schlosser, we spend more on fast food than movies, books, magazines, newspaper and recorded music — combined. That's a lot of Big Mac's and Krystals and Chic-Filets and Frosties and tater tots.

So, what are you hungry for? Americans crave a fast fill-up for all kinds of hungers — fortune, fame, fun, power, possessions, sensual pleasure, etc. But Christ challenges us to think outside the Big Mac box when He says in Matthew 5:6, "Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, For they shall be filled." These words compel us to think beyond the felt, physical needs of the body to the deeper spiritual needs of the soul. God wants us to experience a a hunger and thirst for the holy. In a world with more appetite for what feels right than for what God says is right, Christians must maintain an acute appetite for righteousness and the things that feed it. I grew up on a farm where we had cows, ponies, chickens, and even a few pigs to tend and feed. One thing became clear through my experiences on that farm — if a cow or horse or pig is healthy, it has an intense appetite for the stuff cows and horses and pigs eat and drink — clover, crushed corn and grain sorghum, other grains, hay and, of course, water. And they stayed busy feeding their hunger and slaking their thirst. You never had to brow beat them or preach sermons reminding them to eat and to drink the things that livestock are supposed to eat and drink! Their appetites and how and what to feed them came built-in. Now, there are no "holy cows," but Christians are called to be holy and love what is right. Do you hunger and thirst for the holy? Are you on a diet that feeds righteousness — Bible reading, prayer, worship assemblies, etc.? What are you feeding and drinking into your mind and heart and home? Just what are you hungry for? Think about it.

"I am the bread of life. Ile who comes to Me shall never hunger, and
He who believes in Me shall never thirst" - Jesus Christ, John 6:35

Dan Gulley
Smithville church of Christ